Geoff Anderson

Host, Tuesday's Night Beat and Substitute Host, All Blues

Geoff Anderson has been a KUVO volunteer for more than 25 years. For almost all that time, he has been on the air Tuesday evenings as the host of The Night Beat with Geoff Anderson. Geoff also regularly fills in as the host for All Blues.

Geoff started in public radio in 1976 at KCSU in Fort Collins. After taking a break from radio to attend law school and start a legal career, Geoff dove back into jazz radio by volunteering at KUVO in 1988 as the station was just starting out.

Geoff is a fan of many types of music and attends concerts around town on a regular basis. He show reviews appear on KUVO's website as well as All About Jazz. Being a music junkie and working in radio during the '70s resulted in Geoff amassing an extensive record collection that he has kept intact to this day.

During his weekly feature, "The Vinyl Vault," on-air every Tuesday at 8:30 PM, Geoff shares a record from his collection that isn't in the KUVO library.

In his spare time, Geoff is a real estate attorney at Sweetbaum, Levin & Sands, PC .

Tune in tonight to the Night Beat with Geoff Anderson for the Winter Fund Drive edition of the Vinyl Vault will feature “Straight Ahead,” the 1974 album from Brian Auger’s Oblivion Express. It was a follow-up to the highly successful “Closer To It!” from the year before. “Straight Ahead” features the great keyboard playing of Auger on both Hammond B-3 and electric piano. A highlight of the album is an extended version of Wes Montgomery’s “Bumpin’ on Sunset.” Check out the Vinyl Vault, Tuesday 2/21 at 8:30 on KUVO/kuvo.org.

Foundation: the base upon which something is built. From houses to skyscrapers, foundations are essential. They must be solid, strong and most of all, immovable. A funk foundation? That, too, must be solid and strong. But immovable? No, quite the opposite. A funk foundation supplies the movement, the locomotion, in a word: the groove.

This week on the Vinyl Vault it’s The Cornelius Bumpus Quartet with their 1983 album “Beacon.” Bumpus played saxophone for the Doobie Brothers during the last few years that band was actively recording albums. After the Doobies broke up, Bumpus formed his own band to play jazz and “Beacon” was the second of three albums he released as a leader. Later, in the 1990s, Bumpus joined Steely Dan and toured with that group for several years before his death in 2004. The Vinyl Vault, Tuesday at 8:30 on KUVO.

 

sfjazz.org

Night Beat host Geoff Anderson shares a review of Eliane Elias's second set at DazzleJazz on November 19, 2015.

novaconcerts.com

Jazz and rock began their courtship in the late 1960s. For a while, it seemed like they would never get together. From the beginning of rock ‘n’ roll in the ‘50s, the two genres had kept their distance from one another, each professing its distaste for the other. Yet despite their initial antipathy, despite their feelings that they had nothing in common, that they would never even be seen together, much less engage in any sort of “hook up” behavior, they eventually fell for each other, formed a union and produced a new breed of musical progeny.

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