Jazz on Film

A new documentary on the life of Nina Simone will be released on Netflix on June 26, 2015.  "What Happened, Miss Simone" (101 mins.) is directed by Liz Garbus.  

"Nina Simone's general narrative has inspired so many young women throughout her career and since her death (in 2003)," said Rodney Franks, host of "Into the Evening" on Jazz89 KUVO.  "She was a complicated spirit, with a lot of depth."

Jazz on Film: Can a Cartoon Swing? You Bet.

Jun 20, 2015

Kaoru is an aloof and woefully introspective high school student. He has moved from school to school and town to town, never making friends and consoling himself with his studies (he is an honor student) and playing classical piano. His father is gone for long stretches and he hasn’t seen his mother in years ever since his parents divorced. Now his finds himself living with relatives in a small coastal town and having to hike up a steep slope to get to his new school every morning.

Jazz on Film: new "Icons" offer jazz as philosophy

Jun 5, 2015

For anyone who’s gotten into a discussion about what jazz is and is not, this one’s for you. For DJs and aficionados who read album liner notes and magazines and scour the record store bins this one is for you too. For all the people who are curious about jazz and what’s happening today this is one you need to see.

Special guest Matthew Goldwasser shares his review of Keep On' Keepin On, an intimate documentary depicting the relationship between a blind piano prodigy, Justin Kauflin, and his teacher,  the legendary Clark Terry. 

Shot over the course of five years, the film covers the journey of two friends confronting the toughest challenges of their lives.

Jazz on Film: An original blues feminist - "Bessie"

May 22, 2015
Frank Masi/HBO

When we first think of the blues the images that first come to mind are either the Mississippi delta men with acoustic guitars like Robert Johnson and Son House or alternately the electrified version advanced by Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf and urbanized in the likes of Jr. Wells and Buddy Guy among many others. However, lost in our understanding of history is the fact that in the beginning, the most famous of early blues musicians were women. They sold the most records and commanded the most attention although apart from only a few their names have largely been forgotten.