First Take

broadwayworld.com

“You’d Be So Nice To Come Home To” was written by Cole Porter in 1942 for the movie “Something to Shout About," where it was debuted by Don Ameche and Janet Blair.

Tune in to First Take with Lando and Chavis - weekdays from 6-9 am MT - for Stories of Standards to hear our favorite versions of this song all week long!

There’s no reference to Christmas or Santa, but “Cabin in the Sky” is full of heavenly imagery and the spiritual struggles within a man.  In the seasonal tug between materialism and morality, I find it the perfect holiday film.

Little Joe Jackson has money problems, gambling with some dangerous gangsters… and he has woman problems too.  But after taking a bullet at a nightclub, Joe has some business to do with the Almighty.  As he lays at the brink of death, which way will he go - the redemptive path of righteousness and salvation, or the drinking and womanizing of his past?

"Well, You Needn’t" | Stories of Standards

Dec 1, 2015
sfjazz.org

"Well, You Needn’t" was written in 1944 by Thelonious Monk. According to biographer Robin Kelley, Monk was inspired by singer Charlie Beamon, who, when told the song would be named for him, replied “Well, you need not” or words to that effect.

Tune in to First Take with Lando and Chavis - weekdays from 6-9 am MT - for Stories of Standards to hear our favorite versions of this song all week long!

Bill Hogan/TNS /Landov

The First Take crew investigates one of the most traditional Thanksgiving sides - green bean casserole - with help from an  NPR special.

This Midwestern-rooted dish - infamous for how people either tend to love or hate it - turns 60 this year.

Hear the full story above.

“Out of Nowhere” | Stories of Standards

Nov 24, 2015
songbook1.wordpress.com

“Out of Nowhere” - composed by Johnny Green with lyrics by Edward Heyman - was released in 1931, as people were beginning to realize that the depression would not be lifting anytime soon.

The song holds on to the possibility of a bright future, with love coming “out of nowhere” but potential for an equally mysterious vanishing back into nowhere.

Written in G major with an A – B1 – A – B2 progression, “Out of Nowhere” easily engages listeners.

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