Colorado Drama

Photo: Michael Ensminger

 

With a tip of the hat to George Bernard Shaw's socialist explication of capitalism, and a skeptical eye towards Mary Baker Eddy's Christian Science, decorated playwright Tony Kushner examines the history of the working class in the U.S. and its future, or lack thereof, through the eyes of Gus Marcantonio (Lawrence Hecht), a former union organizer and long-time member of the Communist Party U.S.A.

For the full review go to coloradodrama.com 

Theatre Review: All My Sons

Apr 2, 2018
Photo Courtesy of Matt Gale Photography 2018

War profiteering is as old as war itself. Those who make their money from armed conflict are sure to arrange it and support it at every opportunity; in fact, the U.S. has been at war for 225 of its 242 years.

Photo Courtesy of Colorado Drama

With the resurgence of the women's liberation movement in the late '60s, the fight for gender equality began to achieve traction; but, it's been a tough, uphill battle, comprised of an accumulation of little victories, as we see in the world premiere of this funny and poignant, mid-'70s dramedy, from the pen of José Cruz González (Sunsets and Margaritas, September Shoes, and more).

Zoey's Perfect Wedding

Feb 17, 2018
Photo Courtesy of AdamsVisCom

As the audience filters into the theatre, the DJ (Nick Ducassi) is already bantering and spinning tunes. The beautifully appointed dining table at the wedding reception is gradually populated by three friends—Charlie (Jeff Biel), Sammy (Grayson DeJesus), and Rachel (Mallory Portnoy)—whom the bride, Zoey (Nija Okoro), has known since college. We then meet a young woman, Missy (Kristin Villaneuva), a recent college graduate, who, for lack of work in her chosen field, is thrust into the role of a wedding planner.

Detroit '67: A Look Back

Feb 13, 2018
Photo Courtesy of Colorado Drama

There is perhaps no greater example of urban decline in the United States, with its attendant racist policies, than the City of Detroit. As a native of that once thriving metropolis, playwright Dominique Morisseau has her hand on the pulse of the notorious, libertine 12th Street neighborhood on the eve of the largest civil disturbance of twentieth century America.

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