Wine and Food Pairing
12:00 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Little India Restaurant's Saag Paneer with Schloss Goblesburg Rose

Saag Paneer
 
2 bunches spinach, roughly chopped
1 bunch fenugreek leaves, roughly chopped
1 tablespoon canola oil
1/2 pound paneer, cubed
2 tablespoons canola oil
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 onion, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 tomato, diced
2 teaspoons garam masala
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
salt to taste
 
Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil. Cook spinach and fenugreek in the boiling water until wilted, about 3 minutes. Drain well and transfer to a food processor. Puree until finely chopped, about 5 pulses.Heat 1 tablespoon canola oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Fry paneer cubes, stirring constantly, until browned on all sides, about 5 minutes. Set aside.
Heat 2 tablespoons canola oil in the skillet and fry the cumin seeds until lightly toasted and aromatic, about 3 minutes. Add onion; cook and stir until onion begins to soften, 4 to 5 minutes. Stir in ginger, garlic, tomato, garam masala, turmeric, and cayenne pepper; cook and stir until tomatoes break down and onions are translucent, about 10 minutes.
 
Stir in spinach and fenugreek, cream, paneer cubes, and salt to taste. Cover and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.
 
 
 
Schloss Goblesburg 2012 Cistercien Rosé
 
When the first wine labeled as a rosé was produced is unknown, but it is very likely that many of the earliest red wines made were closer in appearance to today's rosés than they would be to modern red wines. This is because many of the winemaking techniques used to make today's darker, more tannic red wines (such as extended maceration and harder pressing) were not widely practiced in ancient winemaking. Both red and white wine grapes were often pressed soon after harvest, with very little maceration time, by hand, feet or even sack cloth creating juice that was only lightly pigmented.
 
Rosé’s, also known as Rosado or Rosato, can be made three different ways and with a wide variety of grapes and can be found all across the globe.
 
When rosé wine is the primary product, it is produced with the skin contact method. Black-skinned grapes are crushed and the skins are allowed to remain in contact with the juice for a short period, typically one to three days. The “must” or freshly pressed juice is then pressed, and the skins are discarded rather than left in contact throughout fermentation (as with red wine making). The longer that the skins are left in contact with the juice, the more intense the color of the final wine.
 
When a winemaker desires to impart more tannin and color to a red wine, some of the pink juice from the must can be removed at an early stage in what is known as the Saignée (from French bleeding) method. The red wine remaining in the vats is intensified as a result of the bleeding, because the volume of juice in the must is reduced, and the must involved in the maceration becomes more concentrated. The pink juice that is removed can be fermented separately to produce rosé.
 
In other parts of the world, blending, the simple mixing of red wine to a white to impart color, is uncommon. This method is discouraged in most wine growing regions, especially in France, where it is forbidden by law, except for Champagne. Even in Champagne, several high-end producers do not use this method but rather the saignée method.
 
An extremely limited production wine, the Schloss Goblesburg 2012 Cistercien Rosé is delightfully unique. For the Cistercien Rosé, the Zweigelt and St. Laurent grape varieties grown in the cooler sites of Gobelburg and Langenlois are used. This type of rosé is somewhat similar to a white wine because no acid reduction is used to emphasize the fine fruity character with a streamlined elegance. Its fragrance and fruit nuances of wild cherry and fresh berries make this Rosé an optimal universal food companion. Very light in color and some nougat and Turkish honey notes. Cool and refreshing. Lean and piquant despite the dominance of Zweigelt, this wine points in the Burgundy direction. So fresh and long.
 
Schloss Goblesburg 2012 Cistercien Rosé is available at Joy Wine and Spirits at 1302 E 6th Avenue, (at Marion) in Denver, 303-744-6219 or www.joywineandspirits.com.