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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Arab Airstrikes Against Yemen Reportedly Could Continue For Months

Yemen's President Abdel Rabbo Mansour Hadi speaks during the opening meeting of the Arab Summit in Sharm el-Sheikh, south of Cairo, on Saturday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 9:41 am

Yemeni President Abdel Rabbo Mansour Hadi described Shiite Houthi rebels who have occupied parts of the country, including the capital, Sanaa, as "puppets of Iran."

The remarks by Hadi, who was forced to flee Yemen amid the rebel onslaught, come as a Gulf diplomatic official quoted by news agencies says that Arab nations allied against the Houthis could continue their airstrikes against the Shiite militia for months.

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The Two-Way
7:49 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Amid Violence, Nigerians Go To The Polls To Choose A President

Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan, left, and opposition candidate Gen. Muhammadu Buhari, right, prepare to sign a renewal of their pledge to hold peaceful "free, fair, and credible" elections, at a hotel in the capital Abuja, Nigeria, on Thursday.
Ben Curtis AP

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 7:54 am

Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET

Nigerians turned out in large numbers to select their next president, a contest between incumbent Goodluck Jonathan and his rival, former military dictator Muhammadu Buhari.

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The Salt
6:54 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Making Cheese In The Land Of The Bible: Add Myrrh And A Leap Of Faith

A Palestinian Bedouin girl milks a sheep in her family's makeshift camp in the West Bank. Herders live close to their animals, their main source of income.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

In spring, West Bank almond trees bloom white. Dry brown hills turn temporarily green and are dotted with bright wildflowers. The ewes and nanny goats of Bedouin herders that wander the West Bank eat well this time of year.

It's cheese season.

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Shots - Health News
6:54 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Indiana's HIV Spike Prompts New Calls For Needle Exchanges Statewide

Needle exchange programs, like this one in Portland, Maine, offer free, sterile syringes and needles to drug users. The programs save money and lives, health officials say, by curtailing the spread of bloodborne infections, such as hepatitis and HIV.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:47 am

Shane Avery practices family medicine in Scott County, Ind. In December, a patient came to his office who was pregnant, and an injection drug user.

After running some routine tests, Avery found out that she was positive for HIV. She was the second case he had seen in just a few weeks.

"Right then, I kind of realized, 'Wow, are we on the tip of something?' " Avery says. "But you just put it away. ... It's statistically an oddity when you're just one little doctor, you know?"

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Latin America
6:54 am
Sat March 28, 2015

In Argentina, Friends, Families Torn Apart By Political Discord

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

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