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1:40 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

A Holocaust Survivor, Spared From Auschwitz At The Last Second

Jack Mandelbaum, a Holocaust survivor from the Polish city of Gdansk, annexed by Nazi Germany during World War II, poses in front of a photograph showing him as a youth.
Tobias Schwarz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 2:10 pm

Seventy years ago, Soviet soldiers liberated Auschwitz, the most notorious of Nazi concentration camps.

Some 300 Holocaust survivors were at Auschwitz on Tuesday, along with several European presidents and other government officials, to honor at least 1.1 million people who were murdered, 1 million of whom were Jewish.

Among those killed there were Jack Mandelbaum's mother and brother. The Polish-born Mandelbaum survived, spared at the last minute by an officer of the dreaded SS who yanked the teen away from his family and sent him instead to a forced labor camp.

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The Two-Way
11:42 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Obama Meets New Saudi King, Balancing Human Rights, U.S. Interests

President Obama meets Saudi King Salman bin Abdul Aziz in Riyadh on Tuesday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 12:39 pm

President Obama arrived in Saudi Arabia today to meet newly crowned King Salman and said in an interview that the U.S. needs to balance its concerns about Saudi human rights with "immediate concerns" such as counterterrorism and regional stability.

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The Two-Way
9:47 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Number Of Exonerations Last Year Reached New High, Report Finds

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 1:40 pm

A record 125 people were exonerated last year in the U.S. after being falsely convicted of crimes, according to a new report. The number surpasses the previous record of 91 set in 2013.

Much of the increase was due to one county in Texas. Thirty-three people in Harris County had their drug convictions thrown out after lab tests found they tested negative for the presence of illegal substances.

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The Salt
9:45 am
Tue January 27, 2015

Beef Packers Block Plan To Revive Growth-Promoting Drug

Cattle in holding pens at the Simplot feedlot located next to a slaughterhouse in Burbank, Washington on Dec. 26, 2013. Merck & Co Inc is testing lower dosages of its controversial cattle growth drug Zilmax drug in an effort to resume its sales to the $44 billion U.S. beef industry.
Ross Courtney Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 12:08 pm

For more than a year, a once-popular drug that makes cattle put on weight faster has been stuck in a kind of veterinary purgatory.

As far as the Food and Drug Administration is concerned, the drug, Zilmax, is legal to use. But large meat packers, which dominate the industry, have ostracized it after the drug was accused of making animals suffer. The drug's manufacturer, Merck, has been working on a plan to rehabilitate it. But that effort has stalled.

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NPR Ed
8:51 am
Tue January 27, 2015

A Teacher's 'Pinch Me' Moment: Cheering The Super Bowl From The Sidelines

The Patriots cheerleaders perform in the first half against the Indianapolis Colts in the 2015 AFC Championship game.
Elsa Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 9:16 am

The NPR Ed team is discovering what teachers do when they're not teaching. Cartoonist? Carpenter? Dolphin trainer? Explore our Secret Lives of Teachers series.

Most teachers will watch the Super Bowl at home, cracking open a beer maybe, or yelling at their flat-screen TVs. Lauren Schneider will be right there on the sidelines, cheering on Tom Brady and her team just feet from the action.

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