NPR Music

Music Reviews
2:44 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

A Sax Trio Taps Tradition While Thriving In The Present

Melissa Aldana and Crash Trio released its self-titled debut album in June.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 15, 2014 5:23 pm

Melissa Aldana, who became the first female instrumentalist and first South American musician to win the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Saxophone Competition last fall, is not the average talent-contest winner.

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Music Interviews
3:23 am
Sun July 13, 2014

The New Thing In Jazz, Revisited

New Orleans pianist Henry Butler (left) and arranger and trumpeter Steven Bernstein will release their collaborative record, Viper's Drag, in the U.S. on July 15.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun July 13, 2014 9:47 am

Impulse Records is the legendary label that proudly delivered the "new thing" in jazz in the 1960s: avant-garde records from the likes of John Coltrane and Pharaoh Sanders. It also helped jazz cross over to a larger audience; quite a few flower children bought Impulse albums.

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A Blog Supreme
3:59 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Remembering Jazz Legend Charlie Haden, Who Crafted His Voice In Bass

Originally published on Fri July 11, 2014 7:39 pm

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
3:52 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Joe Locke On Piano Jazz

Joe Locke.
Joseph Boggess Courtesy of the artist

Known for the emotional range of his solo work, vibraphonist Joe Locke has established himself as a composer, bandleader and educator. He has recorded with artists such as Eddie Henderson and Grover Washington Jr., and he continues to tour worldwide.

In this episode of Piano Jazz, Locke performs his original composition "Seven Beauties" on piano, as well as a medley of songs by Joni Mitchell and Carly Simon on vibes. Host Marian McPartland joins in for a duet of the standard "I Should Care."

Originally broadcast in the fall of 1996.

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
1:21 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Ryan Truesdell's Gil Evans Centennial Project On JazzSet

Ryan Truesdell conducts the Gil Evans Centennial Project at Newport.
Erik Jacobs for NPR

Gil Evans was born in Canada in 1912. He latched onto jazz and, in time, taught himself to write it. First, for dancers, Evans arranged tunes off the radio for the Claude Thornhill Orchestra as well as the sweet, warm sounds of flutes and French horns. Then Evans downsized the Thornhill sound to a nonet for The Birth of the Cool.

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