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The Two-Way
11:05 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Obama Announces New Sanctions On Russia

Obama, shown here on July 16, warned Tuesday that costs for Russia will continue to grow as it aids Ukrainian separatists
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 2:19 pm

This post was updated at 4 p.m. ET:

President Obama announced a new round of economic sanctions against Russia's banking, energy and defense sectors on Tuesday.

"Because we're closely coordinating our actions with Europe, the sanctions we're announcing today will have an even bigger bite," Obama said on the South Lawn of the White House.

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Shots - Health News
10:02 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Getting Hospice Care Shouldn't Have To Mean Giving Up

Patients who get the comforts of palliative care as well as disease treatment live longer, studies show, than those who only get treatment for the disease.
Annette Birkenfeld iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 12:31 pm

It's a painful dilemma for seriously ill Medicare patients: To receive the extra support, counseling and care provided by the program's hospice benefit, they have to agree to stop receiving curative treatment for their disease.

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All Tech Considered
9:54 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Solving The Scourge That Is Slow Hotel Wi-Fi

SpeedSpot is a free app that lets you test the speed of Wi-Fi networks in hotels and share the test results instantly.
Courtesy of SpeedSpot

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 2:06 pm

You know how it feels. You're a moderately frequent business traveler and trying to get some work done from your hotel. But you're slowed — and sometimes stalled — by an intermittent Internet connection. Your hotel Wi-Fi has the download speeds of an early 1990s dial-up connection.

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Tue July 29, 2014

NCAA Reaches $75 Million Settlement In Head-Injury Lawsuit

Penn State running back Evan Royster eludes a tackle by Eastern Illinois' Adrian Arrington during a 2009 NCAA college football game in State College, Pa. Arrington was one of the athletes who sued the NCAA over concussions.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 9:40 am

The NCAA has reached a settlement with former athletes that provides $75 million for medical monitoring and research into head injuries. The settlement also calls for a change in the way schools handle head trauma.

As USA Today explains, the NCAA currently requires that member schools only have a concussion management plan. The settlement would require schools to make changes to their policies and "institute return-to-play guidelines."

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Goats and Soda
7:55 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Time To 'Girl Up': Teens Fight For The Right To School, Soccer

Watch out, Congress: Girl Up activists came to the nation's capital in June to lobby for issues affecting girls in the developing world. From left, Alexandrea Leone (Ewing, N.J.), Grace Peters (Flemington, N.J.), Aklesiya Dejene (Chicago), Isabella Gonzalez and Erika Hiple (Stockton, N.J.)
Ryan Kellman NPR

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 4:20 pm

They are seven girls in their teens and early 20s, awake at the ungodly (for them) hour of 8:30 a.m. With sleepy smiles, the young women slip into a windowless conference room in a Washington, D.C., hotel to talk to a reporter, who's curious to find out: What's it like to be a global girl activist?

And they're the experts. They're supporters of the U.N. Foundation group called Girl Up, which has the manifesto of "uniting girls to change the world."

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