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Three Miles Ahead

11 hours ago

It's been said Miles Davis is to jazz is like Hemingway is to the American novel, like Picasso is to art. But he was more than just a trumpeter — he was an icon of style and artistry.

Jazz Night in America explores three interpretations of Miles Davis — on the silver screen, the page and on the bandstand. We speak with actor Don Cheadle, who directed, produced, wrote and starred in Miles Ahead; writer Quincy Troupe, who helped Davis write his autobiography; and trumpeter Keyon Harrold, who led a special tribute concert at Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola.

Cecile McLorin Salvant And Sullivan Fortner

11 hours ago

Ever since the earliest days of jazz music, the pairing of piano and voice has frequently attained a deeply personal level of communication. It's evident in the distinct chemistry between two rising stars of their instruments: pianist Sullivan Fortner and singer Cécile McLorin Salvant.

Jazz Night In America gets to know the charming duo on stage at Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola and beside a piano in a Harlem brownstone.

When the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau looked into the Mississippi-based regional bank BancorpSouth, it didn't just review thousands of loan applications. It sent in undercover operatives — some white, some black — who pretended to be customers applying for loans.

"They had similar credit scores and similar background and situations," says CFPB Director Richard Cordray. "Our investigation had found that BancorpSouth had engaged in illegal redlining in Memphis, meaning refusing to lend into specific areas of the city."

In Zimbabwe's capital city, police fired tear gas and water cannons to disperse a demonstration that the country's top court had ruled could proceed.

Opposition leaders termed Friday's march in Harare a "mega-demonstration." It marked "the first time that Zimbabwe's fractured opposition joined in a single action to confront President Robert Mugabe's government since 2007," as The Associated Press reports.

The obscene, threatening voicemail left for Maine Rep. Drew Gattine certainly wasn't anonymous.

"Mr. Gattine, this is Gov. Paul Richard LePage," it began. ""I would like to talk to you about your comments about my being a racist, you c********r" — a vulgarity referencing fellatio.

"I want you to prove I'm a racist. I've spent my life helping black people and you little son of a bitch, socialist c********r," he continued, using the same expletive, " ... I am after you."

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