NPR Music

A Blog Supreme
3:18 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Wayne Henderson, Jazz Crusaders Co-Founder, Dies

The late Wayne Henderson toured with an incarnation of The Crusaders in 1995.
Simon Ritter Redferns/Getty Images

Wayne Henderson, trombonist and co-founding member of the popular jazz-funk band The Jazz Crusaders (later known as The Crusaders), died Friday, April 4, in Culver City, Calif. The cause of death was heart failure, according to The Crusaders' manager. Henderson was 74.

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
10:44 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Mulgrew Miller On Piano Jazz

Mulgrew Miller onstage in 2011 in Potenza, Italy.
Giovanni Marino Getty Images

On this episode of Piano Jazz, Mulgrew Miller's unique harmonic and rhythmic style comes through in his composition, "Carousel." He also joins host Marian McPartland in performing Duke Ellington's "What Am I Here For?"

Mulgrew Miller died on May 29, 2013, following complications from a stroke.

Originally recorded Sept. 9, 2002.

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A Blog Supreme
11:53 am
Tue April 1, 2014

A Guitarist Starts Anew, Except For This Old Song

Matthew Stevens will record his debut album this year.
Maximilian Motel Courtesy of the artist

Matt Stevens' recorded debut as a leader was supposed to have come out back in 2011.

"I had a record that was completely done," the guitarist says. "But circumstances change, and by the time it came to release it, I wanted to do something totally fresh."

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
12:28 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Dianne Reeves On Piano Jazz

Dianne Reeves.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri May 13, 2011 10:33 am

This Piano Jazz episode from 1999 features one of today's preeminent jazz singers. Dianne Reeves brings her rhythmic virtuosity to a sparkling set of standards, including duets with host Marian McPartland on "Close Enough for Love" and "Softly, As in a Morning Sunrise."

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A Blog Supreme
9:34 am
Fri March 28, 2014

'A Love Supreme' Comes Alive In Unearthed Photos

John Coltrane during the recording of A Love Supreme in December 1964.
Chuck Stewart Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Whenever photographer Chuck Stewart was hired by a record company to document a recording session, he would shoot during the rehearsal takes, playback and downtime. The company would take what it needed, the remainder likely never to be developed, much less published. After decades in the photography business, and thousands of album covers to his name, he's amassed a lot of negatives.

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