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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Jawbone Fossil Fills Big Gap In Human Evolution, Scientists Say

This 2013 photo shows the LD 350-1 mandible just steps from where it was found in Ethiopia. The jawbone fragment is the oldest known fossil from an evolutionary tree branch that eventually led to modern humans, scientists say.
Kaye Reed AP

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 2:59 pm

A partial jawbone found in Ethiopia is the oldest human-related fossil, scientists say.

NPR's Christopher Joyce, who is reporting on the story, tells our Newscast unit that the discovery fills in an important gap in human evolution. He says:

"The fossil consists of a partial jawbone and several teeth. It dates to about 2.8 million years ago.

"The team says the fossil appears to belong to an individual from the beginning of the ancestral line that led to humans. That would make it the earliest known Homo — the human genus.

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Shots - Health News
12:45 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Few Clues On Health Law's Future Emerge In Supreme Court Arguments

Opponents of the Affordable Care Act protest outside the Supreme Court Wednesday before oral arguments in the second major challenge to be heard by the justices.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 1:30 pm

For the second time in three years, the Affordable Care Act went before the Supreme Court Wednesday. And before a packed courtroom, a divided group of justices mostly picked up right where they left off the last time.

Once again, people inside the courtroom and out were left to wonder where Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Anthony Kennedy, considered swing votes in the case, stand. A decision is expected by the end of June.

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Shots - Health News
12:45 pm
Wed March 4, 2015

Programs Help Students Cut Back On Booze, But Not For Long

Women and younger students were more likely to drink less after alcohol-education programs.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 2:35 pm

Most colleges require students to go through some sort of alcohol education program. When I was a freshman in college, I was required to play a video game that involved helping Franklin the frog navigate through various college parties without succumbing to alcohol poisoning. (Easy, Frank — remember to hydrate).

Other universities require students to watch educational videos or take online quizzes about appropriate alcohol use.

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The Two-Way
11:45 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Ferguson Report: Former Officer Won't Face Civil Rights Charges

The Ferguson, Mo., police department is criticized in a new Justice Department report. The department says there is no evidence to warrant civil rights charges over the death of Michael Brown last August.
BILL GREENBLATT UPI /Landov

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 5:00 pm

(This post was last updated at 7 p.m. ET.)

Darren Wilson, the former Ferguson, Mo., police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown last August, will not face federal civil rights charges over the killing. That's according to the Justice Department, which has now released its reviews of both the shooting and the local police department.

While Wilson will avoid federal charges, the Justice Department review found that the Ferguson Police Department engages in "a pattern of unconstitutional policing."

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The Two-Way
11:07 am
Wed March 4, 2015

U.K. Government Selling Its Share Of Eurostar

Eurostar unveiled its e320 fleet in November 2014 at St. Pancras Station in London.
Tristan Fewings Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 5:22 pm

The British government says it is selling its stake in Eurostar, the high-speed rail service linking London to Paris and Brussels. The government is selling its full 40 percent stake in the company to a group of international investors for $1.1 billion.

The move is part of an effort by Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne to sell a number of national assets to bring in $20 billion by 2020.

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