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Latin America
5:43 am
Sat April 18, 2015

In Panama, Restoring Streets And Reforming Gangs At The Same Time

Former gang member Ricky James (left) and developer K.C. Hardin in Casco Viejo, the historic old city.
Carrie Kahn NPR

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 8:59 am

Panama, like its Central American neighbors, is struggling with a rise in gangs. A recent census by the country's security forces put the number of criminal organizations operating in Panama now at about 200.

One neighborhood, in the capital's historic old city, is taking on its gang problem with a group of strange bedfellows.

First, meet K.C. Hardin.

"I moved to Panama 12 years ago just to surf and do nothing for a couple years, I thought," says Hardin.

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Parallels
5:42 am
Sat April 18, 2015

As Greeks And Germans Negotiate Debt, Reparations Issues Resurface

Greek Orthodox priest Apostolos Stavropoulos, 41, lights a torch inside the mausoleum in the village of Distomo in June 2013 on the eve of the 69th anniversary of the massacre committed by the Nazis during World War II. The remains of the more than 200 villagers killed, including women and children, are kept here.
John Kolesidis Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 9:14 am

The village of Distomo is tucked into the foothills of central Greece, near the ancient city of Delphi. Had recent history been kinder to it, the village might have been known for its 10th-century Byzantine monastery or its postcard scenes of grandfathers like Lukas Pergantas, tending their small vineyards.

But Pergantas says his hometown is defined by a horrific massacre by Nazi forces on June 10, 1944.

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It's All Politics
3:41 am
Sat April 18, 2015

The Cat-And-Mouse Game Of The Great Clinton Chase, Iowa Edition

Reporters and campaign staffers rush to their cars to get to Hillary Clinton's first Iowa campaign stop.
Tamara Keith NPR

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 8:59 am

Editor's Note: This is a reporter's notebook from NPR's Tamara Keith, who is covering the Hillary Clinton campaign.

The e-mail from the Clinton campaign came late on Monday. Meet at the Panera Bread in Davenport, Iowa, at 9:45 in the morning. I was to be one of about a dozen reporters in a press pool given access to an unpublicized stop. What we quickly learned was that the restaurant was a decoy. The unannounced meet-and-greet was happening at a small coffee shop 20 minutes away in Le Claire.

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Parallels
3:16 am
Sat April 18, 2015

From Losers To Possible Kingmakers, A Scottish Party Comes Back Strong

Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland's first minister and leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP), delivers a speech in Glasgow, Scotland, on March 28. After its loss at the polls last year on the issue of Scottish independence, the party has quadrupled its membership and is on the ascendant.
Russell Cheyne Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 8:25 am

Political life is full of comeback stories, but few are quite as dramatic as the boomerang that Scottish nationalists have experienced over the last six months.

Last September, the Scottish National Party lost a vote on whether to break away from the United Kingdom.

Now, membership in the SNP has quadrupled, and that unexpected turn of events means that this party, dismissed as a loser last fall, could determine who becomes the next prime minister after British elections in a few weeks.

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Goats and Soda
2:59 am
Sat April 18, 2015

In 'Song Of Lahore,' A Race To Revive Pakistani Classical Music

Asad Ali, 63, was unemployed for four years when Pakistan banned live music in 1977. He now plays the guitar for Sachal Studios Orchestra around the globe and in his hometown, Lahore.
Courtesy of Mobeen Ansari

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 8:36 am

In his home in Lahore, Pakistan, Saleem Khan holds up his late father's violin. There are no strings, the wood is scratched and the bridge is missing.

"There was a time when people used to come to Lahore from all over the world to hear its musicians," the 65-year-old violinist says in the new documentary, Song of Lahore. "Now we can't even find someone to repair our violins."

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