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5-Hour Line Turns Barbecue Pilgrims Into Cash Cow For Locals

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Texas has a barbecue joint known as much for its tender brisket as for the line of people waiting outside.

At Franklin Barbecue in Austin, people start lining up around 5 a.m., waiting six hours chatting with other line-waiters until the restaurant opens at 11 a.m.

This barbecue place is such a big deal, that entrepreneurs, like Desmond Roldan, are cashing in on its fans.

"People know me. I'm a big deal," he says, chuckling.

The ride-hailing service Uber has served more than 1 million customers in Philadelphia, despite operating under disputed terms for nearly a year. Now the city's regulators are taking the company to court.

Uber says it doesn't plan to stop operating in the city where it first launched service last October.

If, like me, you're an amateur taster of beer and wine, inevitably you've asked yourself why you don't taste that hint of raspberry or note of pine bark that someone else says is there.

Prosecutors say the man charged with fatally shooting a sheriff's deputy at a Houston-area gas station fired his weapon at the victim a total of 15 times, including in the back of the head.

Shannon Miles, who is charged in the capital murder of 47-year-old Deputy Darren Goforth, was in a Texas district court Monday and is being held without bond. Harris County District Attorney Devon Anderson did not comment on a motive but said Miles used a .40 pistol during the encounter.

Sometimes fast food just isn't fast enough. A new highly automated restaurant that opened in San Francisco on Monday looks to speed service through efficiency — you won't see any people taking your order or serving you at the eatsa quinoa eatery.

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