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Dwike Mitchell On Piano Jazz

4 hours ago

Pianist Dwike Mitchell (1930-2013) joined bassist and French-horn soloist Willie Ruff in 1955 to form the Mitchell-Ruff Duo, which created a stir in New York nightclubs and around the globe as they gained recognition for their elegant sound.

On this 1989 episode of Piano Jazz, Mitchell demonstrates his formidable technique, touch and feeling in "Lush Life," and he and host Marian McPartland form their own duo to perform "Don't Worry 'Bout Me."

In what could prove the largest-ever merger in the insurance industry, Aetna has announced a $37 billion deal to acquire rival Humana.

The agreement, announced by the Hartford, Conn.-based Aetna, "would bolster Aetna's presence in the state- and federally funded Medicaid program and Tricare coverage for military personnel and their families," according to The Associated Press.

When The Fish You Eat Have Eaten Something Toxic

5 hours ago

Some tasty saltwater fish carry a toxin that you may never have heard of.

And a recent study found that more people in Florida may be getting sick from eating fish contaminated with the toxin than previously thought.

By comparing Florida public health records with survey results from thousands of fishermen, scientists from the University of Florida found that ciguatera fish poisoning, as the condition is called, is significantly underreported in the state.

Updated at 10:05 a.m. ET

Syrian forces have carried out airstrikes to push back what is being described as a major offensive by militants affiliated with al-Qaida to seize the key northern city of Aleppo.

As NPR's Deborah Amos reports from the Turkish border, the battle surprised the regime, but also surprised more moderate rebels, who tell NPR they are not part of the offensive.

Chocolate might be headed toward a crisis, depending on whom you ask.

That's at least what the 2015 Cocoa Barometer has to say. It's an overview of sustainability issues in the cocoa sector, written by various European and U.S. NGOs, and was released in the U.S. this week. And what they're really worried about is the people who grow the beans that are ground up to make our beloved treat.

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