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It sounds like a politician's dream: a machine that can tell you exactly what to say to change a voter's mind.

Well, that's what a political scientist has come up with — at least, a first tentative step in that direction.

Using text from a pro-Obamacare website and testing different combinations of sentences on volunteers, an algorithm created by Northeastern University assistant professor Nick Beauchamp was able to identify optimally persuasive terms that make people more inclined to support the landmark health care law.

The signs read: "Take 'em down! Renoir sucks!" and "We're not iconoclasts[;] Renoir just sucks at painting."

Led by Max Geller, a handful of people protested Monday outside Boston's Museum of Fine Arts.

Their grievance?

The fact that paintings by renowned French Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir are hanging in the museum.

A former president of the U.N. General Assembly, John Ashe, is accused of accepting more than $1.3 million in bribes in return for his support of a real estate project in Macau, according to U.S. court documents.

Ashe is a former U.N. ambassador for Antigua and Barbuda who led the General Assembly from 2013 to 2014. He lives in New York state.

NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports:

Under the cover of darkness and using a crane, workers removed a 6-foot granite structure from the grounds of the Capitol in Oklahoma City.

The Ten Commandments monument has been the subject of controversy and debate for years. Back in June, the state Supreme Court decided that the religious display on public property violated the Constitution.

At the time, angry lawmakers even threatened to impeach the high court justices.

We want to cut through the spin with a new feature we're calling "Break It Down."

Break It Down is going to be a regular part of our campaign coverage. We're going to try some new things. It might read a little differently from time to time. But our goal is to zoom in on what the candidates are saying, and give you the factual breakdown you need to make a sound judgment.