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Should they stay or should they go?

Today the United Kingdom votes on the so-called Brexit, or the possibility of leaving the European Union.

Polls opened at 7 a.m. local time (2 a.m. ET) and will close at 10 p.m. (5 p.m. ET). British citizens, including some who live abroad, are eligible to vote, as well as citizens of Ireland and Commonwealth countries who live in the U.K. or Gibraltar.

The votes (marked by an X on a paper ballot) are counted by hand, and official results likely won't be known until Friday morning.

Watching For Clues

Five years ago, the residents of a southern Chinese village drew the world's attention when they chased Communist Party officials out of their hamlet and elected a new leader.

Now, the land disputes that spurred them to action remain unresolved, and the residents of Wukan village are rising up in protest once again after their elected leader was detained on corruption charges Saturday.

The Challenge Of Taking Health Apps Beyond The Well-Heeled

10 hours ago

When you hear the phrase "digital health," you might think about a Fitbit, the healthy eating app on your smartphone, or maybe a new way to email the doctor.

But Fitbits aren't particularly useful if you're homeless, and the nutrition app won't mean much to someone who struggles to pay for groceries. Same for emailing your doctor if you don't have a doctor or reliable Internet access.

Gregory "Buster" Coleman is a cop who's been through a lot.

He was the Liberian National Police Commissioner during the Ebola outbreak.

He and his men would wear protective equipment when they were out on patrol during the epidemic. But the garb is "not made for policing," says the robust 36-year-old. "If we had to make a difficult arrest the suit could tear." He paused. "Every night I would have to strip outside my house, be sprayed down with chlorine then shower before I could even greet my children."

That was a bit unnerving.

So was going to Harvard.

Updated at 1:15 p.m.

House Democrats have ended their almost 26-hour-long sit-in to push for gun control legislation, pledging on Thursday afternoon to continue their fight once Congress returns from the July Fourth recess.

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., ended the daylong protest surrounded by his Democratic colleagues. The civil rights leader proclaimed that this "is a struggle, but we're going to win this struggle."

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