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The Two-Way
2:03 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Federal Regulators Link Workers' Comp Failures To Income Inequality

A few hours after ProPublica and NPR issued the first in a series of reports about workers' compensation "reforms" sweeping the country, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration coincidentally released a paper linking workplace injuries to income inequality.

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Parallels
1:58 am
Thu March 5, 2015

In Berlin, Grassroots Efforts Work To Integrate Inner-City Schools

Young fans of the German national football team drink ice tea in July 2010 as they watch the FIFA World Cup semi-final match Germany vs Spain in an Arabic cafe in Berlin's Neukolln district. The neighborhood has gentrified rapidly in recent years, but many of the white families moving in leave once their children reach school age. Local groups are trying to change that.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

In parts of Berlin, racial segregation in schools is far from official policy, but it is often a reality. In the fast-gentrifying district of Neukölln, young, mainly white professionals usually move away as soon as their kids reach school-age.

But small, parent-led initiatives are working to change this trend and ensure their local schools better reflect the neighborhood.

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Science
1:45 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Jaw Fossil In Ethiopia Likely Oldest Ever Found In Human Line

With the help of researcher Sabudo Boraru (right), anthropologist Chris Campisano, of Arizona State University, takes samples from the fossil-filled Ledi-Geraru project area in Ethiopia. The jaw bone was found nearby.
Courtesy of J Ramón Arrowsmith

Scientists working in Ethiopia say they've found the earliest known fossil on the ancestral line that led to humans. It's part of a lower jaw with several teeth, and it's about 2.8 million years old. Anthropologists say the fossil fills an important gap in the record of human evolution.

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Parallels
1:44 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Boris Nemtsov: 'He Directed His Words Against Putin Himself'

Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov, who was shot dead last Friday, was one of the most outspoken critics of President Vladimir Putin. No arrests have been made in his killing.
Ivan Sekretarev AP

Boris Nemtsov was just 37 when Russian President Boris Yeltsin named him deputy prime minister in 1997. Trained as a physicist, Nemtsov symbolized a new generation of young leaders who rose to power in the chaotic aftermath of the Soviet breakup.

But after Vladimir Putin became president, Nemtsov joined the liberal opposition and became an outspoken critic. He was arrested on several occasions, but continued his attacks on the Russian leader.

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Shots - Health News
1:43 am
Thu March 5, 2015

Toronto Infertility Clinic Offers Controversial Treatment

Along with sperm, the in vitro procedure adds fresh mitochondria extracted from less mature cells in the same woman's ovaries. The hope is to revitalize older eggs with these extra "batteries." But the FDA still wants proof that the technique works and is safe.
Chris Nickels for NPR

Melissa and her husband started trying to have a baby right after they got married. But nothing was happening. So they went to an infertility clinic and tried round after round of everything the doctors had to offer. But nothing worked.

"They basically told me, 'You know, you have no chance of getting pregnant,' " says Melissa, who asked to be identified only by her first name to protect her privacy.

But Melissa, 30, who lives in Ontario, Canada, didn't give up. She switched clinics and kept trying. She got pregnant once, but that ended in a miscarriage.

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